It is currently Wed Aug 15, 2018 11:28 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 189 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 4:52 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:13 pm
Posts: 3595
Location: North Carolina
Great book, his In A Sunburned Country is fantastic.

_________________
God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. - Romans 5:8

Letterboxed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 4:59 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:29 pm
Posts: 6513
Location: In the ether
Love Bryson. I've read most if not all of his books. The Lost Continent, The Mother Tongue, and I'm a Stranger here Myself are all recommended.

_________________
I'm going to wait until you're sitting next to Ericubus and then I'll ask how you're feeling. - caryc


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 7:58 am 
Offline
Singularity ∞
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:20 pm
Posts: 10545
The Lost Continent is what I'm currently reading. The Mother Tongue and I'm a Stranger here Myself are already queued on the Kindle. Especially looking forward to The Mother Tongue.

_________________
"Hitler had a pretty good idea there." - Eric


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 9:28 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:29 pm
Posts: 5911
Location: Walpole, MA
Image

Last book in the Parker series (until Donald E. Westlake un-retired the character and his Richard Stark pseudonym in the late 90's) is a corker...Parker goes looking for the money he stashed back in Slayground, finds it missing, and gets into the middle of a mob power struggle, calling in favors from virtually every criminal he's ever associated with in the previous books in order to stage all-out war.

_________________
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 7:09 am 
Offline
Singularity ∞
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:20 pm
Posts: 10545
Image

A major disappointment. A missed opportunity. What could have been a genuine look into small-town America, a truly enlightening and funny foray into the stuff found outside the tourist traps -- good, bad and ugly -- was instead “here are my fleeting impressions of how houses look as I whip past them at 50 mph, and if you act now I’ll mock poor people at no extra cost!”

He’s certainly funny. He’s certainly clever. He’s certainly an excellent writer. But unlike A Walk in the Woods or A Brief History of Everything, this certainly doesn’t leave me with a good impression of him as a person.

Not that that should matter –- in 99 percent of books it doesn’t -– but when it comes to define what this book is…

Bryson spends a significant amount of time bitching about the way in which charming America has been lost to strip malls and chain shops, a complaint I’m wholeheartedly on board with, but then spends most of his time eating at fast food joints. On several occasions he approaches some establishment that seems interesting, a genuine, out of the way, small town establishment, and he decides to move on. When he doesn’t, what we tend to learn is, “My waitress was a rube.”

Even still, as a road trip memoir this could have been a great highway tour of America, but Bryson’s elitist disdain for the people he sees really grates after a while. The entire first half of the book is spent mocking the poor but rarely makes any effort to know them. His few interactions merely result in him degrading them behind their back. He doesn’t even bother to hide his disgust. “These folks are poor,” he all but says, “isn’t it awful that I have to be near them?” When he finally admits he was wrong to think this way about 3/5 through the book, it’s only in passing. A brief line, and then he moves on. He comes across as the worst sort of pretentious douchebag, gleefully aloof even while he himself is (he admits) a slovenly schmuck. For example, at one point early in the book, he somehow turns a positive interaction with a friendly Southern cop into a major negative because, gosh, the guy had an accent.

All of this would be fine if I actually enjoyed taking this journey with him. Alas, I did not.

I delighted in walking the Appalachian Trail with Bryson. His wry observations and sharp, cynical humor gave that walking memoir a wonderful edge that never failed to entertain, and in between him sharing his experiences and the things he saw and people he interacted with, he filled the book with great bits of history, science, and Generally Fun Learnin’ Stuff. A Walk in the Woods was fantastic. I devoured it.

The Lost Continent has precious little of that. It's not insightful and it's hardly entertaining. It’s a long series of “I drove down this highway and then down this highway, and I drove through East Bumblefuck at 50 and the houses were not well kept, then I drove down this highway into another awful state, but when I stopped in West Poopersville I was surprised that the houses were nice, so I ate at McDonalds and watched TV in my motel room and only talked to one person, who I learned nothing about but I now have a great fake conversation to relate that will make them look like a total rube.” He blows through small towns on the interstate and then pretends both to have experienced them and that they are somehow representative of small town America.

He fails to engage people (and most of those he does are waitresses). He loathes cities for being cities and loathes small towns for being small towns. He decries the shallowness of all he sees while he himself offers observations no deeper than a puddle after a light spring rain.

I found it especially hilarious that he would aloofly lament, "Oh, it's so sad that all these fat tourists are blind to how shallow all of this is, it's all surface and no depth," only he wouldn't know if they are actually blind to it because he never bothered to engaged with people, shallowly judging their surface while he (a fat tourist himself, natch) display no depth in his observations. (Hint, Mr. Bryson: Most tourists in tourist traps are well aware that they are in a shallow tourist trap; they're not blind to it.)

Instead of living up to the promise of being a genuine journey through small town America, Bryson spends most of this book being small, judgmental, and mean-spirited. I wasn’t looking for a rose-colored glasses celebration of all things Americana or a relentlessly positive joyride through Normal Rockwell paintings or a with-blinders-on, rah rah rah tome about why America is great. Not even remotely. None of my criticism is because "gosh darnit, he insulted 'Murica!" But I also wasn’t looking to read some boorish hypocrite kvetch for 300 pages,

Wearisome.

_________________
"Hitler had a pretty good idea there." - Eric


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 11:12 am 
Offline
Singularity ∞
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:20 pm
Posts: 10545
More:

He frequently criticizes America’s must-drive-everywhere culture (and I wholeheartedly agree with him), but he barely ever gets out of his car during this trip. Most of what he shares in this book is glimpsed from his car, and when he does stop he rarely leaves the roadside shithole where he pulled over.

He complains about the lack of real, genuine downtowns and local businesses – and again, I wholeheartedly agree to the extreme – but whenever he finds a local joint the only thing he can manage to do is insult the people who run/work at the establishment.

That he went in with preconceived notions and sought to find them is abundantly clear. He speaks at length about the deep racism and bigotry of the South, but despite never actually finding any – which isn’t a denial that it exists (it certainly does) – he manages to class the people he drives by as bigots.

Oh, and in the same breath he expresses astonishment at having met a well-spoken, professional black woman, as if “she’s well-spoken” itself isn’t the kind of barely-veiled racism more common today than overt bigotry. (I guess in all fairness you can point out that he wrote this in the late 1980s, but it makes his soft bigotry no less interesting to note given the context in which it came up.)

And then there’s this:

He spends page after page running down his father’s bumbling attempts at family vacations, yet his father actually comes across as a sweet, caring man who managed to do what his travel writer son does not: actually absorb the people and places he is visiting!

I like Bill Bryson’s work! I really do. “A Short History” is perhaps the finest mainstream science book ever written. It’s wonderful, informative, accessible and funny.

This book was not funny. It was not witty. It was not informative.

It was just the shallow, mean-spirited work of a small little man.

_________________
"Hitler had a pretty good idea there." - Eric


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 1:46 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:29 pm
Posts: 6513
Location: In the ether
Great review Shoe, though I'm sorry I recommended it!

_________________
I'm going to wait until you're sitting next to Ericubus and then I'll ask how you're feeling. - caryc


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 12:02 pm 
Offline
Singularity ∞
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:20 pm
Posts: 10545
No worries, I was reading it prior to your recommendation anyway.

Regardless, I'm glad I read it, and it doesn't change my desire to read more of his titles, especially his books on language. Except for a dictionary and a long forgotten travel book, this was his first work. He gets better, so I remain confident that other titles will live up to those I've already read.

I'll tell you what, though, the more I think about The Lost Continent the more things I want to pick at! ;-)

_________________
"Hitler had a pretty good idea there." - Eric


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 12:13 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:13 pm
Posts: 3595
Location: North Carolina
Shoe wrote:
No worries, I was reading it prior to your recommendation anyway.

Regardless, I'm glad I read it, and it doesn't change my desire to read more of his titles, especially his books on language. Except for a dictionary and a long forgotten travel book, this was his first work. He gets better, so I remain confident that other titles will live up to those I've already read.

I'll tell you what, though, the more I think about The Lost Continent the more things I want to pick at! ;-)



Image

After A Walk In The Woods my second favorite Bryson book.

Oh and the Shakespeare book is pretty good as well.

_________________
God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. - Romans 5:8

Letterboxed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 9:41 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:29 pm
Posts: 6513
Location: In the ether
Shoe wrote:


I'll tell you what, though, the more I think about The Lost Continent the more things I want to pick at! ;-)


In my defense, I have only read it once, and it was when it first came out, so perhaps my memories were clouded by the other excellent material he's written. I think you'll enjoy The Mother Tongue, as well as In a Sunburned Country, and I'm a Stranger Here Myself more than Lost Continent. I also like the Dictionary of Troublesome Words.

_________________
I'm going to wait until you're sitting next to Ericubus and then I'll ask how you're feeling. - caryc


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 12:46 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:29 pm
Posts: 5911
Location: Walpole, MA
Image

_________________
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 7:06 pm 
Offline
Singularity ∞
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:20 pm
Posts: 10545
Image

This was pretty bad.

Early in the book one of the main scientists, Levine, goes to dinosaur island with only a Costa Rican guide to accompany him. The guide is torn apart by raptors right before his eyes, then Levine himself is attacked. End chapter.

Our other heroes then get a call from him. He’s in hiding someplace. The raptors didn’t kill him, but they know where he is. He can smell them right outside the door! Please come save him!

Our other heroes get to the island and locate the guy. He somehow got from the deep jungle to a factory facility miles away unharmed, even though History’s Most Efficient Predators (according to the book) were out there hunting him, and in fact had LEAPED ON HIS BACK just a few chapters before. No explanation how he went from being attacked to being safe and sound miles away. It just happened.

Worse still, the guy acts as if no attack took place. “Hey guys, good to see you here. Let’s get to our research!” He outright DENIES that he was ever in danger! And this is after being chased by a T-Rex. And after they realize some kids secretly tagged along on the expedition (naturally).

Meanwhile, Dr. Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum from the first movie), who in the first book was shredded and nearly killed by dinosaurs after watching probably a dozen others die in the chaos, is there as well, and he doesn't argue with the idea of sticking around on an island filled with free roaming dinosaurs, even though he knows there are packs of raptors and multiple T-Rexes here..

Worse still redux, he never tells his companions that he has already seen rampaging dinosaurs go on a killing spree! They have kids with them, they have a Guy Who Got Attacked By Raptors, Miraculously Survived, And Seemed To Forget The Whole Experience, they're on an island filled with free roaming dinos, and the whole time Malcolm is keeping mum about what took place a few years prior.

In fact, when they are first set to go to the island to rescue Levine, he KNOWS it’s full of killer dinosaurs and HE DOESN’T TELL ANYONE. HE DOESN'T TELL ANYONE ABOUT ALL THE KILLER DINOSAURS!!

And I won't even get into the entirely pointless bad guy faction. You could have removed them entirely and had the same exact story.

I know this was written under pressure to produce a sequel to Jurassic Park, with big movie rights waving under his nose – some scenes are so obviously conceived as movie fodder it’s silly – but come ON. Crichton is better than this.

Thumbs down.

_________________
"Hitler had a pretty good idea there." - Eric


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 7:10 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:15 pm
Posts: 1521
Crichton is usually good for a mindless page-turner but when he shits the bed, he shits the bed hard.

_________________
"Look, when you need 25 copies of V.I. Warshawski, you need 25 copies of V.I. Warshawski." - JFelix


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:08 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:29 pm
Posts: 5911
Location: Walpole, MA
Shoe wrote:
Meanwhile, Dr. Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum from the first movie), who in the first book was shredded and nearly killed by dinosaurs after watching probably a dozen others die in the chaos, is there as well


No, he was ACTUALLY KILLED by dinosaurs in the first, and Crichton retconned his death (he was only mostly dead...!) for the second book just because everyone loved Goldblum's performance in the movie. That's the level of lazy the book was. As mediocre as Spielberg's second movie was, it was a masterpiece compared to this.

Shoe wrote:
I know this was written under pressure to produce a sequel to Jurassic Park, with big movie rights waving under his nose – some scenes are so obviously conceived as movie fodder it’s silly – but come ON.


What's funny about that is how little of the second book made it into the second movie...the film was basically just leftover setpeices from the first novel that Spielberg couldn't fit into the first movie, plus all-new stuff (the "jeeps dangling over the cliff" scene is actually very well-done, and the highlight of the movie...appears nowhere in the novel).

_________________
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 8:10 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:13 pm
Posts: 3595
Location: North Carolina
Read


Image



A good book but it would have been a lot better 200 pages shorter and tighter.

_________________
God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. - Romans 5:8

Letterboxed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 8:36 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:29 pm
Posts: 5911
Location: Walpole, MA
John Carter wrote:
A good book but it would have been a lot better 200 pages shorter and tighter.


That could be said for about 90% of King's post-80's output. He's a talented writer, but no editor seems daring enough to tell him to pare his books down a bit.

_________________
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 6:56 pm 
Offline
Singularity ∞
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:20 pm
Posts: 10545
Cru wrote:
Crichton is usually good for a mindless page-turner but when he shits the bed, he shits the bed hard.

Pretty much, yeah. Those I liked I really enjoyed -- they're smart page-turners that play with fun science concepts while still being pretty by-the-book thrillers -- and those I disliked I HATED.

Here's how they break down for me (of those I've read):

ENJOYED:

1969 The Andromeda Strain
1980 Congo[48]
1987 Sphere[49]
2002 Prey[56]

HATED:

1990 Jurassic Park[50]
1995 The Lost World[53]
2006 Next[58]


Prey teeters. It can slip into "hated" if you look too closely, but I enjoyed it all the same. I do own Timeline and Eaters of the Dead, just haven't gotten around to them yet.

_________________
"Hitler had a pretty good idea there." - Eric


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 6:59 pm 
Offline
Singularity ∞
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:20 pm
Posts: 10545
John Carter wrote:
Read

Image

A good book but it would have been a lot better 200 pages shorter and tighter.

As in the last 200 pages, right? Because that ending suuuucked.

Otherwise, I liked this a damn lot.

King's problem is that he writes without a plan. He says so. He is anti-plotting. So he starts off with some people and puts them in a situation, and that's great because he's FANTASTIC at sketching out human beings and coming up with cool scenarios.

But then he just keeps going and going and going and going because he has no plan, until eventually things crawl to a stop and/or end poorly.

As an author, he's better than he's sometimes given credit for, but he'd also be WAY better with an editor willing to tell the Golden Goose "change this."

_________________
"Hitler had a pretty good idea there." - Eric


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 7:38 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:29 pm
Posts: 5911
Location: Walpole, MA
Shoe wrote:
But then he just keeps going and going and going and going because he has no plan, until eventually things crawl to a stop and/or end poorly.


It's probably a combination of success = excess (like how the Matrix and Pirates Of The Caribbean sequels just got more unreasonably overlong and unwieldy as they went along, seeming like they were stuffed to the gills with extraneous "business" just to bloat one sequel's worth of ideas into two movies to earn more profit) and fallout from King's substance abuse problems in the 80's...his book The Tommyknockers is like a cry for help from a not-well man using a bugshit crazy sci-fi tale as a blazingly obvious metaphor for his own personal demons. Plus, he's said in interviews and and afterwords in his books that he just like to make shit up and see what happens, which can sometimes work (The Green Mile, originally serialized in monthly installments, comes to mind) but more often not...it's like he comes up with great ideas and characters, but then pulls whatever ending out of his ass that he can think of just as an excuse to stop writing. Many of the film adaptations of his books actually benefit by deviating from the text and paring out all of the subplot flab.

_________________
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2013 6:26 am 
Offline
Singularity ∞
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:20 pm
Posts: 10545
Monterey Jack wrote:
It's probably a combination of success = excess (like how the Matrix and Pirates Of The Caribbean sequels just got more unreasonably overlong and unwieldy as they went along

It's not that. It really does come down to an editorial issue and King, being Stephen King, being largely untouchable.

When you write a novel, you'll inevitably write loads of stuff that won't end up in the finished product. Scores of character scenes that end up being redundant, subplots that don't work, entire characters that end up getting stripped out, scenes that get merged together, characters that get merged together. This is very, very common. You're like a sculptor, putting a load of material out there and then chipping away at it to find the piece within.

So it's not a matter of excess, it's just a part of the process.

The problem is that Stephen King is Stephen King. He's mega successful, so he doesn't feel much need to do the difficult work of paring down his work -- and it IS difficult work; utterly painstaking and my least favorite part of the process (ask Cary what a pain in the ass it is) -- because it's doing fine as it. Even more important, what editor or agent is going to want to rock that boat? If you've got Stephen King as your client, man, you let him shit on paper if he wants to. You DON'T want him to walk away, and that shitty paper will make a million regardless.

Here's a good example of the then and now: Arguably his most beloved work outside the Gunslinger books is The Stand. Prior to its original release some 400 pages were cut from the book. An entire novel's worth of material! This was at the behest of his publisher.

He didn't write an entire novel's worth of extra material because he was indulging in the excess success brings, ala the "we have to top the last thing" mentality of Pirates of the Caribbean. It was just part of the process. At the time, his publisher's could make requests/demands like that and he was going to listen. Better works were the result.

Today? The dude is Stephen King. That is not a boat to be rocked. They leave him alone because he's a proven seller. Want to reinsert all that cut material? Go for it! Want to write another 1,200-page monster that would be better off at 750 pages? Go for it!

$$$

So it's not success per se that prompts him to write all that excess stuff that bulks up his books even though they'd be better with a more heavy-handed editor, because he'd be doing it regardless, it's success that causes his editors and publishers to take a hands-off approach with him.

I blame his editors, not him.

_________________
"Hitler had a pretty good idea there." - Eric


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2013 6:33 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:29 pm
Posts: 5911
Location: Walpole, MA
Image

_________________
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2013 9:37 pm 
Online
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:57 pm
Posts: 5432
Location: Likely underwater
Shoe wrote:
(ask Cary what a pain in the ass it is)


It's a huge pain in the ass. Mostly due to the time it takes and the fact that you're going over something for the billionth time that was once fresh and fun and new to you as the writer. The thing you loved becomes tedious but like Shoe said, it's necessary and the more you work at it, you find new things to love about it.

But it's easily the worst part of the process and I totally understand why someone who was that successful would say, "Fuck it. My books are still selling." I love Stephen King and have read the vast majority of his work but as the books got longer and more sprawling, I've passed on more than a few. It's true that Kings "cutting room floor parts" are better than most people's "A" material, but it's still excess and it's pretty obvious to almost everyone who reads it.

_________________
"Watch my stuff." - Monterey Jack


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 11:16 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:13 pm
Posts: 3595
Location: North Carolina
Read


Image


Great book, I couldn't read it fast enough!

_________________
God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. - Romans 5:8

Letterboxed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 4:01 pm 
Offline
Singularity ∞
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:20 pm
Posts: 10545
John Carter wrote:
I couldn't read it fast enough!

Why, were the words melting away before you could get to them or something? :wink:

_________________
"Hitler had a pretty good idea there." - Eric


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 4:18 pm 
Online
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:57 pm
Posts: 5432
Location: Likely underwater
Still on my quest to read all the Fleming James Bond novels back to back. So far:

Casino Royale
Live and Let Die
Moonraker
Diamonds Are Forever
From Russia, With Love
Dr. No
Goldfinger
For Your Eyes Only
Thunderball

Reading: The Spy Who Loved Me

Four more to go after that. So far, my favorites have been Goldfinger and For Your Eyes Only (which is a collection of short stories). The Spy Who Loved Me is an interesting one in that it's written through the eyes of a woman who Bond becomes involved with. I'm about a third of the way through and Bond hasn't made an appearance yet. Apparently, this was a book that critics hated and Fleming was not proud of either. So far it's not bad but it definitely has a different flavor than any of the others.

_________________
"Watch my stuff." - Monterey Jack


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2013 11:06 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:13 pm
Posts: 3595
Location: North Carolina
Read


Image



Great book.

I'll be reading it again soon.

_________________
God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. - Romans 5:8

Letterboxed


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2013 12:07 pm 
Online
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:57 pm
Posts: 5432
Location: Likely underwater
Finished

Image

It's pretty awful. No wonder Fleming disowned it. At 135 pages it's twice as long as it needed to be and not nearly up to the caliber of the other books in the series so far.

Also, I know the image is to the audio book but this cover image is on my ePub version. The retro covers are all awesome.

_________________
"Watch my stuff." - Monterey Jack


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 4:28 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:29 pm
Posts: 5911
Location: Walpole, MA
Image

_________________
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2013 7:13 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:29 pm
Posts: 5911
Location: Walpole, MA
Image

_________________
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 2013 7:58 pm 
Offline
Singularity ∞
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:20 pm
Posts: 10545
READ:

Image

This was terrible.

I'd rant about how bad it was, but it's just not worth the energy. It's a bad book. End of story.

_________________
"Hitler had a pretty good idea there." - Eric


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 2013 8:09 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:29 pm
Posts: 5911
Location: Walpole, MA
Dan Brown: even his name is boring.

_________________
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 4:49 am 
Offline
HMFIC
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 7:30 pm
Posts: 4472
Location: Detroit
Image
Image
Image

Who was it who was making his way through the Bond books as well? Can't remember. I was doing that last summer, and just continued with the next two in a row. I like that in From Russia With Love, Fleming gives all the planning of the Russian plot and doesn't even introduce Bond until a third of the way through the book. Probably the best installment.

Trying to decide whether I should read Dr. No, some Dickens, or re-read A People's History of the United States.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 1:34 pm 
Online
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:57 pm
Posts: 5432
Location: Likely underwater
Eric wrote:
Who was it who was making his way through the Bond books as well? Can't remember. I was doing that last summer, and just continued with the next two in a row. I like that in From Russia With Love, Fleming gives all the planning of the Russian plot and doesn't even introduce Bond until a third of the way through the book. Probably the best installment.


That was me. I just finished You Only Live Twice this morning. Only The Man With The Golden Gun and Octopussy to go. What you said about From Russia With Love really does set it apart from all the others. That look inside SMERSH gives you a real sense of how the game is being played that some of the other books don't.

My favorite so far has been On Her Majesty's Secret Service. To me it had the biggest emotional payoff of any of the books and Fleming uses it to set up You Only Live Twice in a way that makes that book my second favorite. In both of those, Bond is less sure of himself and in some pretty deep waters throughout.

In my opinion, the books get consistently better with the only exception being The Spy Who Loved Me.

_________________
"Watch my stuff." - Monterey Jack


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 3:00 pm 
Offline
Singularity ∞
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:20 pm
Posts: 10545
Those 007 covers are outstanding. Wow, I love them.

_________________
"Hitler had a pretty good idea there." - Eric


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 6:49 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:29 pm
Posts: 5911
Location: Walpole, MA
caryc wrote:
In my opinion, the books get consistently better with the only exception being The Spy Who Loved Me.


It's a crying shame Fleming died at the height of Bond-Mania in 1964...I would have loved more 007 books from him into the 70's and even 80's.

_________________
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.
Wiggle your big toe.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 189 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group