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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 2:08 pm 
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Eric wrote:
After seeing the movie version of Guardians of the Galaxy, I read the 25 issues of the comic it was based on. Not sure if that was V2 or V3 or what, but it ended up with the "Cancerverse" story arc.

This run is in my queue. I was going to read it first, but figured I should do the one I talk about above first.
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Also re-read the Avengers "Korvac" story, just because that jogged my memory. Not really as good as I remembered.

They almost never are.

That said, just got done reading a chunk of classic Fantastic Four (issues #44-51) and they were great.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 6:44 pm 
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Terrific Shining sequel marred only by a fairly absurd semi-retcon that connects two of the main characters. Nice to see King bringing in a book barely over the 500 page count...this one is lean and mean.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 6:41 am 
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Eric wrote:
After seeing the movie version of Guardians of the Galaxy, I read the 25 issues of the comic it was based on. Not sure if that was V2 or V3 or what, but it ended up with the "Cancerverse" story arc.

I'm reading this right now. Six or seven issues in, it's been pretty good so far (though I'll be damned if I can figure out why there is a Secret Invasion crossover, considering it takes place across the entire universe).

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 7:48 am 
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Just finished:

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http://www.amazon.com/Reading-Comics-Gr ... 0306816164

Broken into two sections, one dissecting the medium, the other dissecting specific works.

The first section of the book discussing how and why comics work, what they mean, what makes the medium special and so on is ... not very good. The author offers no real insights. His prose is littered with so many asides it's distracting*. And he rambles. Hooo boy does he ramble.

This section aspires to be something great and useful and exploratory, but fails utterly.

For every passage of tremendous insight into why comics work and what truly makes a great comic tick, there is another that is completely full of itself.

The guy knows his stuff. He can pull up obscure factoids from random 1972 DC comics like nobody's business. But he also comes across as the kind of guy who would praise the most worthless indie trash just because it's "indie." Reads like a smart blogger a little too in love with the sound of his own voice (and aren't all bloggers, including myself?). Heavier editing would have been welcome.

It doesn't help that he's hugely condescending when it comes to mainstream comics. He claims to love them, and indeed he can conjure up loads of obscure trivia, but there is an aloof, "I'm above this material" quality to his commentary that is a big turnoff.

When indie books are good, they're fantastic and really showcase the full scope of what the medium can do, moreso than any mainstream cape book ever could.

But what uber snobs don't like to acknowledge is that indie comics are no different than mainstream comics in one important regard: 95% of them are total shit.

The second section is a series of in-depth looks at selected artists/works the author feels are important. These range from indie classics (Cerebus, Love & Rockets, etc.) to obscure indie to mainstream books (Starlin's Warlock, Ditko's marvel work) to mainstream landmarks (Watchmen, Frank Miller's work, etc.).

This section of the book is pretty good. (Full disclosure: I skimmed a few chapters on works I was unfamiliar with.) In this case, the author really DOES have interesting things to say about the work he examines. His writeup on Starlin's Warlock , for example, is quite good and has me itching to read that full saga. His politics pop up now and then in unwelcome ways, and he inexplicably defends Miller's DK2 -- which prompted me to pull out my copy and revisit it -- but by and large there is some worthwhile commentary here on works like Blankets, The Invisibles, and others.

Verdict: Do not purchase this. DO borrow it and skim through the chapters in the second half concerning works you like.





*This is a flaw in my own work, but he even makes me look restrained when it comes to this kind of thing!

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 5:34 pm 
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Shoe wrote:
Eric wrote:
After seeing the movie version of Guardians of the Galaxy, I read the 25 issues of the comic it was based on. Not sure if that was V2 or V3 or what, but it ended up with the "Cancerverse" story arc.

I'm reading this right now. Six or seven issues in, it's been pretty good so far (though I'll be damned if I can figure out why there is a Secret Invasion crossover, considering it takes place across the entire universe).


Because an industry-wide event requires every series to tie in. Regardless of how ridiculous.

Crossovers were what drove me away from comics in the early 90's. That, Rob Liefield, and pouches.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 7:03 pm 
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 13, 2014 3:11 pm 
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Finally read Bosworth's legendary biography on Montgomery Clift.

Heartbreaking. Pure heartbreakage. I'll never see a Clift movie with the same eyes again. Hollywood is one fucked up place. And stardom is about the last thing that's good for anybody.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 2014 6:22 pm 
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2014 12:46 pm 
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I haven't picked up a book in weeks. I think I've burned out.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2014 1:01 pm 
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Excellent book on the farming of oysters.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2014 6:58 am 
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John Carter wrote:
I haven't picked up a book in weeks. I think I've burned out.

I've been slogging through the same handful of books for months. They're not bad books, I just temporarily burned out and am having a hard time getting myself engaged again. It's why i switched to comics for a while.

For me, this stuff always runs in cycles. Up with one form of entertainment/distraction, down with another. Sometimes I'll blow through five or six books a month, other times it'll barely be a book a month.

These last six months or so have been my slowest in YEARS. (I keep track and have a list of all the books and graphic novels I've read, in order, month-by-month, going back to roughly the late 1990s.)

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2014 8:10 am 
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Shoe wrote:
John Carter wrote:
I haven't picked up a book in weeks. I think I've burned out.

I've been slogging through the same handful of books for months. They're not bad books, I just temporarily burned out and am having a hard time getting myself engaged again. It's why i switched to comics for a while.

For me, this stuff always runs in cycles. Up with one form of entertainment/distraction, down with another. Sometimes I'll blow through five or six books a month, other times it'll barely be a book a month.

These last six months or so have been my slowest in YEARS. (I keep track and have a list of all the books and graphic novels I've read, in order, month-by-month, going back to roughly the late 1990s.)



I'm used to the cycle thing also but I fear this has more to do with health and depression issues. Despite my best efforts I may be forced to get an insulin pump and I'm not handling that fact very well.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2014 8:13 am 
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Ugh. I'm sorry to hear that. Totally understandable why that has you distracted.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2014 9:09 am 
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John Carter wrote:
I'm used to the cycle thing also but I fear this has more to do with health and depression issues. Despite my best efforts I may be forced to get an insulin pump and I'm not handling that fact very well.
I'm sorry to hear that, Man, but hopefully once you get going it won't be as bad as you are anticipating.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2014 12:27 pm 
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John Carter wrote:
I'm used to the cycle thing also but I fear this has more to do with health and depression issues. Despite my best efforts I may be forced to get an insulin pump and I'm not handling that fact very well.


Very bummed to hear that, however like Ericubus said it may not be that bad overall. Plus there are advances and changes happening constantly in medicine so maybe there will be an alternative solution in the near future.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 6:13 am 
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Thanks guys, maybe I'll get my mind around it at some point but to have accomplished what I have (lost 60 pounds) and to still be looking at this is pretty disheartening. I picked up Brian Keen's The Rising yesterday evening and started working my way through that.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 7:17 am 
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I genuinely appreciate you sharing that. I've put on weight in recent years that has not yet been shed. Between that and my poor eating habits, I worry about developing diabetes. Reminders that this is a very real danger are always a good thing.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 7:38 am 
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Shoe wrote:
I genuinely appreciate you sharing that. I've put on weight in recent years that has not yet been shed. Between that and my poor eating habits, I worry about developing diabetes. Reminders that this is a very real danger are always a good thing.


The best advice I can give is don't let it happen, it will wreck your life in so many ways. When I was first diagnosed everything I read said that by eating right, losing weight and exercising you could reverse it. That hasn't worked for me and according to my doctors it never will, despite everything I've done my condition has gotten worse not better. I have to take multiple medications daily, I have very little feeling in some parts of my fingers from pricking them to check my blood sugar, I have bruises and dead skin in areas where I've given myself insulin injections. The medical and pharmaceutical bills alone are enough to make you weep at times. If any of this prompts you to get ahead of it and change things so it doesn't happen to you then I'm glad I shared this.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 7:54 am 
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Thanks. I have no health coverage right now, so that would be catastrophic.

The Mrs. and I did talk about jointly having a "let's lose some weight and get healthy" challenge together, but we have yet to start. Perhaps we should. I need to retrain my body to enjoy being healthy again.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 8:34 am 
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John Carter - I have a dear friend, a childhood diabetic, who said her insulin pump saved her life. I know they are pricey, but look into the testers that you use on your arm, instead of your finger. Good luck, any managed illness is a slog.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 9:05 am 
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Thanks, I've got another doctor appointment for next Monday for more blood work and discussions.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 9:38 am 
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Cosmos
by Carl Sagan


Sagan's landmark book spawned an even bigger landmark television series and helped inspire awe and a love for astronomy in an entire generation.

Which is pretty impressive, given how often this book is a total bore.

Look, I'm a huge astronomy buff. Have been all my life. I've read countless books on the topic. I've watched dozens of hours of documentaries. I've listened to countless hours of college lectures on the topic just for fun. I eat this stuff up. And Sagan, he was a talented writer. When he waxes poetic, it's genuinely poetic. He can really turn a phrase, and he ponders wonderfully huge questions that are enjoyable to ponder with him.

To be honest, though, this classic tome has a habit of drifting into endless digressions about philosophers of the past that had me nodding off. Sorry, but I'm just not interested in your views about how Augathothese influenced the thinking of Speracoles, who helped build a society who thought thinking about stuff was really awesome, because yay thinking! And that makes up a not insignificant chunk of this book.

Worse still, it's so fluffed up with redundancies I often felt like I was reading the same chapter over and over again. Near the end, when he launches into his "peace on Earth, let's do some nuclear disarmament stuff, let's not blow ourselves up stuff," you want to be on board with him -- we all agree that blowing up the Earth is a bad idea, right? -- but he just won't shut the hell up about it even long after he's made his philosophy clear. He outlines his views, you get the point, then he rephrases them and outlines them again, and then again, and then another rephrasing so he can do it again. I kept glancing at how much was left to read, thinking, "Dude, are you done yet? I just want to finish your damn book already."

The stuff I liked I liked a lot, but you've got to go into this keeping in mind that this is NOT a book on astronomy, it's a philosophy book.

It's a wonderful, hopeful, awe-filled, inspiring philosophy book. But a philosophy book all the same.

And philosophy bores me.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 5:13 pm 
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I have to admit that I've never read this book. I am not a huge astronomy buff although I do like astronomy. I've just never felt the need to read this.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2014 8:38 am 
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More derivative YA crap. At least there wasn't a "which hot guy do I choose?" love triangle, I'll give it that...

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2014 9:28 am 
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Monterey Jack wrote:
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More derivative YA crap. At least there wasn't a "which hot guy do I choose?" love triangle, I'll give it that...



:lol:

I see him every other Wednesday at my writer's group. I'll let him know you're not a fan.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2014 9:47 am 
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Thanks to a cross country plane trip that saw me spend approximately 17 hours in the air and only about 8 hours of actual work-related meetings, I burned through three books in three days.

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Fast Times at Ridgemont High

I first read this back in the 1980's when I was in high school. It still holds up. It's amazing how many of the classic lines from the movie were ripped straight from the book. Some of the funniest moments were real and while the movie took some liberties by combining a few characters here and there, overall it's a very accurate depiction.

If you've never read it, you should. By the end, I felt sad that I couldn't find out more about what happened after high school.


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Books of Blood Vol. 1 (Spoilered for size)

I'm rereading this series. I hadn't them all since the late 1980's when they were first being published. I forgot about how great Volume 1 really is. Some of my favorite Barker stories are in this book (Pig Blood Blues, The Yattering and Jack, In The Hills, The Cities). There's not a bad one in the whole bunch.

Spoiler: show
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Books of Blood Vol. 2 (Again, image spoilered for size)

Again, it's amazing how strong this collection is. With the exception of "New Murders in the Rue Morgue", I love all of the stories in this volume. Even that story isn't a bad one. It's just not one of my favorites. Without a doubt, the two that stand out to me are "Dread" and "The Skins of the Fathers".

Starting Vol. 3 tonight.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2014 7:16 pm 
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caryc wrote:
:lol:

I see him every other Wednesday at my writer's group. I'll let him know you're not a fan.


I realize these books are written for teenagers who have never seen a movie made before 1999, but seriously...there is not ONE IDEA in it that isn't ripped off from Soylent Green, Parts: The Clonus Horror, Logan's Run and any other 70's dystopian sci-fi movie you could mention. If I were 25 years younger, I'm sure it wouldn't matter that much, but there's "homage", and there's "my audience will never see what I'm ripping off, so who cares?". It's no wonder these kinds of books are literally given away for free at my local movie theater...each one plays more like a studio pitch than an actual novel. At least it doesn't do the usual 70's thing of concealing the sinister "secret" of its "utopian" futuristic setting until halfway through, because I would have seen through it by the end of the third chapter.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2014 9:38 pm 
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Well I believe he's on book four now and I know there's a studio working on either a movie or TV series based on the Unwind series. I will say that I haven't read it though. I have read some of his fantasy books. The one concerning Tesla's inventions is very good and a lot of fun.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2014 4:38 am 
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I dunno...I suppose I'm just so attuned to the clichés of the current YA trend (mostly through the bad movies made from them) that I don't give them a break. It wasn't badly-written, per se, just wearyingly predictable.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 20, 2014 10:58 am 
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Read

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Not bad.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 20, 2014 4:38 pm 
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Books of Blood Vol. 3

While this one slips a little from the first two in my opinion, the stories are still great. Favorites in Vol. 3 are Son of Celluloid, Scape-Goats and Human Remains. This also has Rawhead Rex which is a fun story but a little bit too by the numbers. It made me want to see the film again though and I haven't seen that since it came out. I'm sure it's aged horribly.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 6:22 am 
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Books of Blood - Volume 4

As consistently strong as all of the other books are, this one may be the best. It's hard for me to tell whether it's because I didn't remember these as well from the first time I read them, or whether it's just Barker getting better at his craft. "The Body Politic" and "Age of Desire" were the only two I remembered the entire plots of from back when I first read them 20 years ago. Granted, both are the types of stories that have some shock value that would stick with you, however they pale in comparison to "Revelations". It's a slow burn of a story, set in the part of Texas that Joe Lansdale books capture so well and the character development has more of a hint of Stephen King than the usual Barker story. I think it's that combination that made it stand out for me. Still, it's the type of supernatural story that would work as a good indie film.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 6:50 am 
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I've been curious about the Books of Blood after seeing him speak at a Fangoria con a few years back. Seemed like an interesting guy.

I wrote an article about it for DIMP. It;s fab:

https://web.archive.org/web/20101122155 ... /clive.php

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 12:48 pm 
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I remember reading that interview. Good stuff. I've been a casual Barker fan over the years. His novels aren't something I seek out but when I get one, I'm rarely disappointed. His short stories were what stuck with me early on. Revisiting those has been a lot of fun.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 1:01 pm 
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I've only read one, Weaveworld, and to be honest i stopped reading it with about 200 pages to go. I remember being fascinated with his ideas but feeling like the story was meandering something fierce.

In his short fiction, perhaps that won't be an issue.

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